Author Topic: OSX Hidden Files  (Read 7512 times)

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Offline Grambo

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OSX Hidden Files
« on: December 18, 2012, 12:19 AM »
The only computer I own with an SD card reader is my MacBook Pro. I love OSX, but I absolutely hate the stupid hidden files it leaves on every folder it ever comes into contact with. It drives me berserk.
The files show up in Everdrive file browsers after putting your SD card into your SD card reader, so here's what I've done to resolve this annoyance.

1) Create a file with Textedit
2) Paste in the code that I've listed below
3) Change all instances of "SNES" in the code to the volume name of your SD card (or if your SD card's volume name is already SNES, you don't have to  :P)
4) Save file (doesn't matter what you call it)
5) Change file extension to ".command"
6) Go into terminal, find the file and use "chmod 777 *filename*" to make the file executable

Now, right before you eject your SD card (after you've finished making all your changes to the SD card) simply run the .command file you've created.
Yay! No more annoying DS_Store, ._AppleDouble crap.

Code:
rm -rf /Volumes/SNES/.Trashes/;
rm -rf /Volumes/SNES/.fseventsd/;
rm /Volumes/SNES/.apdisk;
rm -rf /Volumes/SNES/.Spotlight-V100/;
find /Volumes/SNES -name '.*' -delete;

Offline Redifer

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 01:11 AM »
Very interesting solution! Too bad you need to sift through Terminal to use it rather than just double-clicking on it. Navigating through Terminal is a pain.

Krikzz has fixed the Everdrive and Turbo Everdrives to ignore the crap files OSX likes putting everywhere. On the Mega Everdrive and Everdrive 64 this was already taken care of before I got them. No clue about SMS, Game Gear or Super Everdrives as I don't own those.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 01:16 AM by Redifer »

Offline Grambo

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 03:09 AM »
Oh nice! I only have the Super Everdrive, so I wasn't aware of other platforms ignoring.

I just wanted to point out, you only have to navigate in the terminal once, to set the *.command file so that it has executable permissions.
After you run through all my steps, it's just a file you double click. Just keep the file somewhere on your computer. It was the most painless solution I could come up with.

Offline Kerr Avon

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2012, 02:27 AM »
Why does the Mac do this? What useful purpose does it serve?

I've never used a Mac, but I've heard they are very good and user friendly, so it seems a bit strange that it does something so counterproductive as standard.

Offline Redifer

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2012, 06:02 AM »
Mac OS X is basically a fancy (and quite proprietary) UNIX derivative. I guess UNIX does stuff like this to keep files sorted a certain way based on the user's preferences. Windows does this as well, I think, but differently. It's just that Windows is so ubiquitous that all other OSes know how to ignore/not copy those files. Just an uneducated guess. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than me on the subject can pipe in.

Offline Grambo

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2012, 07:06 PM »
A "." in front of a file indicates a hidden file in a UNIX system. In OSX, this still holds true, however, Apple created a Hidden file attribute that determines whether or not to reveal the file in Finder. Windows systems only use a Hidden file attribute.

Whether or not an operating system auto creates files or not totally depends on the operating system itself. Windows does it (Thumbs.db), OSX does it (to an extreme), FreeBSD won't even auto-mount a usb drive, all Linux distros vary...

The reasoning behind it is usually for caching, indexing or settings of some sort. For example, Thumbs.db contains little pictures for all your thumbnail images and .DS_Store contains custom folder attributes (mostly graphical stuff, such as the last position of the children files/folders).

I understand the reasoning behind creating these files, but OSX is just too overkill with it all, in my opinion. If it only stuck to HFS file systems, I would be fine with it, maybe even a fan of it, but the fact remains that it creates files in every folder it ever touches (even including network connections, for some horrible reason that I don't understand).

Offline vmhomeboy

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2012, 04:37 PM »
There's no need to run manual rm commands to deal with these files. You can you the dot_clean console command to do it all for you.

Offline Redifer

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Re: OSX Hidden Files
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2012, 02:32 AM »
That doesn't do it all. Plus you need to run it every time you insert the disc.