Author Topic: 1989 famicom with true rgb, s-video, stereo sound, nes controller ports  (Read 16396 times)

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Offline Drakon

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A famicom worthy of the up-coming famicom everdrive.  This famicom outputs true rgb, perfectly tweaked s-video, stereo sound with the mixing, bass and treble levels balanced, a switch to real time switch between the default and upgraded audio circuit, powerpak compatibility, and nes controller ports.

I call this thing, the famicom 9000! (although it's really over 9000):





Demonstration video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wkdapA2xx0o

Now that I have this and the same upgrades done to my av famicom I think I'm ready for the krikzz famicom flashcart.

Offline dvd2vcd

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nice work, im ready with my virgin famicom AV, im so excited :)
ED64 v2.5 - MEGAED X7 - TED v2.4 - SD2SNES rev F - EDN8 fami - EDGB X7 rev B

Offline Drakon

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nice work, im ready with my virgin famicom AV, im so excited :)

Thanks.  I really can't wait to get a well made famicom flash cart.  The powerpak feels so 2005.

Offline JimmyMz

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removed
« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 06:26 PM by jimmyemunoz »
Nothing for sale right now, but more stuff coming soon. Message me on this forum by clicking the envelope icon under my name.

Offline Redifer

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How does Paperboy look on it?

Offline Drakon

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http://homepage3.nifty.com/F-LABO/ProductsList.html 
What was the turn around time, from payment to delivery?

It looks like you installed the Labo kit and made a few modifications, such as:
1) tapping the Famicom controller connections to add NES controller sockets
2) tapping the PPU connection to relocate the connection to the rear
3) adding a 7805 voltage regulator with heat sink

Is this correct?

The RGB PPU is just ridiculously expensive, but I'm sure we'll see a new IC one day; or at the minimum a NES clone with RGB capability right out the box.
I shall wait and see  ;)

Turn around time is completely random.  Also I use a proxy company which adds to the cost. 

"1) tapping the Famicom controller connections to add NES controller sockets
2) tapping the PPU connection to relocate the connection to the rear
3) adding a 7805 voltage regulator with heat sink"

Yeah I did all of the above, I didn't add a 7805 I desoldered it from the rf box I removed.  I also used the power jack from the rf box as well as the fuse.  Even the heatsink is from the rf box I just bent the one side flat.  I relocated the ppu to the rear to make the kit fit.  Having the rgb ppu in the regular place and having the rgb signals travel to the kit at the back added video jailbars.  The secret is feeding the rgb from the ppu into your rgb amp / video encoder chip with the shortest distance possible between the ppu and the amp / encoder.  I got into rgb ppu collecting before they became expensive which is why I have them.  The ppus are really expensive because I offer a service for people to pay me to build the ppu into your nes / famicom system.  People already have made fpga setups that read the digital ppu signals and turn it into hdmi / rgb / whatever format you desire.  Although if you're using a fpga to recreate the ppu you might as well be playing your nes games on an emulator at that point.  I wish the official rgb ppu chips were more plentiful, I guess a fpga ppu is better than nothing.

Also for the f-labo kit I modified the circuit a lot, the video encoder has been upgraded from a cxa1645 to a cxa2075.  I built a small circuit that takes the nes master clock signal and divides it down to the right speed to drive the cxa2075 removing the colour bleeding.  By default these kits drive the cxa2075 using a crystal oscillator which adds the colour bleeding.

How does Paperboy look on it?

Probably like anything else, pixel perfect.  And if it's one of the few games that uses colours the rgb chip doesn't use you can always romhack it to work with the ppu.  I romhacked the pallette in super mario adventure and now it works fine with the rgb setup.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 05:03 PM by Drakon »

Offline dvd2vcd

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nice work, im ready with my virgin famicom AV, im so excited :)

Thanks.  I really can't wait to get a well made famicom flash cart.  The powerpak feels so 2005.

i guess you be selling powerpak on soon...i got the snes powerpak, its ok i guess, i dont like the small menu text tho, now im thinking of upgrading to sd2snes
ED64 v2.5 - MEGAED X7 - TED v2.4 - SD2SNES rev F - EDN8 fami - EDGB X7 rev B

Offline dvd2vcd

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your youtube vid is brill, i really admire your work, looks like your set up for FCED ;)
ED64 v2.5 - MEGAED X7 - TED v2.4 - SD2SNES rev F - EDN8 fami - EDGB X7 rev B

Offline Drakon

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i guess you be selling powerpak on soon...i got the snes powerpak, its ok i guess, i dont like the small menu text tho, now im thinking of upgrading to sd2snes

I'll be keeping the powerpak it's a piece of history haha.

your youtube vid is brill, i really admire your work, looks like your set up for FCED ;)

Thanks!

Offline Grambo

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Good lord that is awesome.
I've heard different stories about the RP2C03B having a different color palette, etc etc... but that looks goddamn amazing.

I'm curious as to why the NES ports (and 1/8" jack) are outboard. Did you not want to mess the console up or is there no suitable mounting location?

I want a RP2C03B so badly, I just can't really afford it.
I am quite interested in RetroUSB's upcoming HDMI mod though...

Offline Drakon

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Good lord that is awesome.
I've heard different stories about the RP2C03B having a different color palette, etc etc... but that looks goddamn amazing.

I'm curious as to why the NES ports (and 1/8" jack) are outboard. Did you not want to mess the console up or is there no suitable mounting location?

I want a RP2C03B so badly, I just can't really afford it.
I am quite interested in RetroUSB's upcoming HDMI mod though...

I literally ran out of space to install the ports the famicom case is teeny.  Normally I do these mods in the av famicom I just built this system for fun.  I've built a few "for the hell of it" systems including the rgb twin famicom, rgb toaster nes, etc etc.  I bought the rp2c03bs for cheap way back when and then when I started offering to build these systems as commissions the price of the rgb ppus went through the roof.  I'm more interested in this:

http://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=9561

It's the same thing that bunnyboy is doing except it outputs rgb / s-video.  Also I've bought products from bunnyboy in the past it was a terrible experience my snes powerpak showed up not working, my sd card reader also showed up not working.  Krikzz does a much better job with his products and customer support (I just avoid the flash based ones if I can find a ram based alternative).  And I like playing these systems on my crt, hdmi is great and all but having rgb / s-video is great for a crt.

Plus bunnyboy seems to not want to let people solder these devices in themselves, I'm pretty sure my work proves I can solder well enough.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2013, 03:18 AM by Drakon »

Offline Grambo

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I'm more interested in this:

http://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=9561

It's the same thing that bunnyboy is doing except it outputs rgb / s-video.  Also I've bought products from bunnyboy in the past it was a terrible experience my snes powerpak showed up not working, my sd card reader also showed up not working.  Krikzz does a much better job with his products and customer support (I just avoid the flash based ones if I can find a ram based alternative).  And I like playing these systems on my crt, hdmi is great and all but having rgb / s-video is great for a crt.

Plus bunnyboy seems to not want to let people solder these devices in themselves, I'm pretty sure my work proves I can solder well enough.

That. Is. Fantastic news.
I'll be following that for sure. RGB with separated H+V sync works fine for me. I'd prefer it to HDMI anyhow.
I also noticed bunnyboy's unwillingness for those who want a do it yourself device. I have ZERO interest in buying a premade console... the hardware side is half the fun for me. He seems to also only want to do toploaders... I want to stick with a toaster.

I have a bit of a concept project for my toaster NES that I may attempt down the road... feel free to tell me if you know it's been done.

What's the biggest problem with the toaster? The goddamn 72 pin press down pins that don't connect, obviously. Now, I've noticed that the black 72 pin adapter module's connection to the NES' board mates perfectly with a cartridge. I've been thinking about chopping the whole thing down (getting rid of the "press down pin" portion completely), finding a way to physically mount the "once was NES board" 72 pin connector so that I get a perfect cartridge connection and then just connecting it to the NES board via ribbon wire.

Cheap, relatively easy, no rare components to track down and a toaster NES that actually loads carts.

Offline Drakon

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I'm more interested in this:

http://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=9561

It's the same thing that bunnyboy is doing except it outputs rgb / s-video.  Also I've bought products from bunnyboy in the past it was a terrible experience my snes powerpak showed up not working, my sd card reader also showed up not working.  Krikzz does a much better job with his products and customer support (I just avoid the flash based ones if I can find a ram based alternative).  And I like playing these systems on my crt, hdmi is great and all but having rgb / s-video is great for a crt.

Plus bunnyboy seems to not want to let people solder these devices in themselves, I'm pretty sure my work proves I can solder well enough.

That. Is. Fantastic news.
I'll be following that for sure. RGB with separated H+V sync works fine for me. I'd prefer it to HDMI anyhow.
I also noticed bunnyboy's unwillingness for those who want a do it yourself device. I have ZERO interest in buying a premade console... the hardware side is half the fun for me. He seems to also only want to do toploaders... I want to stick with a toaster.

I have a bit of a concept project for my toaster NES that I may attempt down the road... feel free to tell me if you know it's been done.

What's the biggest problem with the toaster? The goddamn 72 pin press down pins that don't connect, obviously. Now, I've noticed that the black 72 pin adapter module's connection to the NES' board mates perfectly with a cartridge. I've been thinking about chopping the whole thing down (getting rid of the "press down pin" portion completely), finding a way to physically mount the "once was NES board" 72 pin connector so that I get a perfect cartridge connection and then just connecting it to the NES board via ribbon wire.

Cheap, relatively easy, no rare components to track down and a toaster NES that actually loads carts.

Mounting the cartridge connector like that is a pain.  Personally I prefer working with famicoms, they do everything a nes does and more.  For my toaster I removed the top of the case, flipped the pcb rightside up so the parts actually face me (had to cut a couple of holes and change a screw mount or two).  I hard soldered the 72 pin connector into a stoneagegamer nes to famicom adapter, that thing is cheap and he has an amazing nes slot on it.  I prefer playing nes stuff on my famicom using a good nes to famicom adapter or just playing the games on the powerpak (or upcoming famicom everdrive).  As for my super toaster I use it to test stuff.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2013, 04:57 PM by Drakon »

Offline Grambo

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I'm having a hard time visualizing what you've done with your toaster, but it does sound like a much better solution.

Re-mounting the PCB upside-down aligns the main PCB in such a way that you can solder in the 72-pin connector so that the connector is in the original position it used to be? Or are you saying that you no longer have a top cover on it and that it doesn't line up anywhere close to what it used to?

I'm not in love with the toaster's hardware... it's really just an aesthetics thing for me. It's the console I grew up with and that's all it boils down to (I recently dug it out and found some of my age 10 past self's soldering work. Pretty shoddy, but I got it working again and that's all that mattered to me at that age :) ). I just want to make a super toaster out of it by the most cost efficient methods I can find.

That stoneagegamer adaptor is a pretty good tip though, never thought of that, thanks :)

Offline Drakon

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I'm having a hard time visualizing what you've done with your toaster, but it does sound like a much better solution.

Re-mounting the PCB upside-down aligns the main PCB in such a way that you can solder in the 72-pin connector so that the connector is in the original position it used to be? Or are you saying that you no longer have a top cover on it and that it doesn't line up anywhere close to what it used to?

I'm not in love with the toaster's hardware... it's really just an aesthetics thing for me. It's the console I grew up with and that's all it boils down to (I recently dug it out and found some of my age 10 past self's soldering work. Pretty shoddy, but I got it working again and that's all that mattered to me at that age :) ). I just want to make a super toaster out of it by the most cost efficient methods I can find.

That stoneagegamer adaptor is a pretty good tip though, never thought of that, thanks :)



Re-mounting the pcb this way lets me get at the chips easier.  Half the stuff on this pcb is socketed it's designed to be messed around with.  By default a nes pcb is mounted upside down, I made it right-side up.  I built a little ppu socket adapter (not pictured) that relocates the ppu socket far away enough to stick in the rgb / audio upgrade kit.  I keep the top off because this's a dev system I use it to test stuff.  I also forgot I desoldered the expansion port.  This's just some ebay 30$ shipped nes but I've learned a lot by trying fun experiments with it.