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Messages - EverNostalgic

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
Because Nintendo didn't make network support for a non-existent flashcart when they designed Super Mario Kart.

... that's why I specifically mentioned this when reasoning about it. People don't even read anymore. Why even bother asking or trying to discuss anything?

2
Huh? What? Why would they need hacked ROMs?

3
(I originally asked this in the "FXPAK (SD2SNES)" category, 18 days ago, still amazingly with not one reply. I'm therefore trying here since it's also slightly more relevant.)

Imagine this:

Joe has a PAL SNES with an EverDrive NetPlay Edition.
Sue has a PAL SNES with an EverDrive NetPlay Edition.

Joe and Sue live in different countries.

Joe wants to play Super Mario Kart against another human being, being sick of playing against the computer players. Joe has zero friends, and even fewer who would want to play SNES with him, and even fewer who would be good at Super Mario Kart and provide a challenge for him.

Luckily, Joe has just bought the new (fictional) EverDrive NetPlay Edition. It's just like a current EverDrive, but it has an Ethernet jack and a custom firmware. Joe has hooked it up with a network cable to his home router. He starts his SNES.

Joe now selects Super Mario Kart in the list of games, and presses the special "Netplay" option. He immediately gets a list of available servers waiting to play for that game, fetched from a user-defined central server which defaults to a stable and popular one which is the de facto official/only such one.

Joe notices that there is currently one person waiting in this "lobby". It's Sue, who is in an identical situation a few countries over. He "joins" her, and the firmware detects that he has one controller plugged in, and that it's in controller port #1.

Now, the game starts up on both Joe's and Sue's SNES. Sue, being the "player 1", selects two players in the game. The input from Sue's controller (plugged into her SNES' controller port #1) travels over the network to Joe's SNES, where it's treated as "player 1". Joe's keypresses travel over the network and are treated by Sue's SNES as if he had his controlled plugged into the second controller port on her machine.

The games naturally have no idea that any kind of network is involved; they just think of/see this as two local players, sitting in the same room with the same SNES.

Since there are bound to be randomized/unpredictable events in most games, the "host SNES" (Sue's, in this case) regularly (often enough) sends over a copy of that SNES' RAM contents to Joe's, so that his SNES can update any differences that may have happened, such as getting a different item when running over a question mark block compared to what the other person's SNES picked, or updating the positions of the karts which may have "drifted" due to different choices being made by the two different (but still PAL) SNESes.

The end result is a smooth, rock-solid experience, and the exact same concept would of course apply to NES, N64 and all the other consoles. Maybe it would even be possible to somehow bridge PAL/NTSC versions, but I would assume that this is a ton of work and may be impossible.

Naturally, things are always much easier to think about than to actually do them, but it seems to me (after thinking about this for quite some time) that it should be at least *technically* possible. It would certainly be great for miserable loners such as myself.

Note that I'm not expecting you to be able to play eight players at once on Super Mario Kart or anything crazy like that. That would require actual (heavy) modifications of the game. I'm simply talking about allowing a "ghost" player two (or more, if the game supported it originally) with real hardware. For the same reason I never want to play a game at all using an emulator ever again, I would feel zero satisfaction from playing a SNES game networked using an emulator. Modern re-releases such as "virtual console" on the Wii/Wii U/Switch are also crap and wholly uninteresting to me.

Also, a big thing about this would be that you wouldn't have to hunt down and befriend somebody using the same emulator and arrange to "meet up" virtually, sharing IP addresses externally using a computer and whatnot. It would not require you to use a computer at all; just flick on the SNES, select your game, join a game (or start one yourself and wait for somebody), and then you play it. It wouldn't even require any kind of account/registration/login stuff.

4
First of all, I am heavily invested in EverDrives for my original consoles. I have zero plans to abandon them, ever, unless they die on me and I cannot figure out how to fix them. The "MiSTer" sounds like "an interesting project to keep an eye on for the future", if nothing else.

Of course, reading their own info, they make it seem like this is a 100% perfect replication of each console/platform. We all know that this cannot possibly be the case. If it were, that would be a scientific revolution and truly Change Everything.

So how close is it to a real NES/SNES/whatever? I notice a total lack of support for N64/Saturn, and the main focus seems to be on old home computers, such as Amigas. (Which *is* interesting to me, but unrelated to this.)

It's frightening to me how many people seem to be completely oblivious to how badly even the best software emulators in existence butcher these classic games, but I've not seen a MiSTer in action in real life nor really even on video. It seems to be almost a mythological thing. From looking at their websites and forums, it takes a *ton* of manual tinkering, and there's a lot of worrying questions about games not working correctly and whatnot, which really makes me question how well it can possibly be "emulating the hardware".

Assuming that my consoles don't start bleeding internally and stop working with my EverDrives/FXPAK PRO, is there any reason to pay any attention to the "MiSTer" for the next 10-20 years or so?

5
Imagine this:

Joe has a PAL SNES with an Everdrive NetPlay Edition.
Sue has a PAL SNES with an Everdrive NetPlay Edition.

Joe and Sue live in different countries.

Joe wants to play Super Mario Kart against another human being, being sick of playing against the computer players. Joe has zero friends, and even fewer who would want to play SNES with him, and even fewer who would be good at Super Mario Kart and provide a challenge for him.

Luckily, Joe has just bought the new (fictional) Everdrive NetPlay Edition. It's just like a current Everdrive, but it has an Ethernet jack and a custom firmware. Joe has hooked it up with a network cable to his home router. He starts his SNES.

Joe now selects Super Mario Kart in the list of games, and presses the special "Netplay" option. He immediately gets a list of available servers waiting to play for that game, fetched from a user-defined central server which defaults to a stable and popular one which is the de facto official/only such one.

Joe notices that there is currently one person waiting in this "lobby". It's Sue, who is in an identical situation a few countries over. He "joins" her, and the firmware detects that he has one controller plugged in, and that it's in controller port #1.

Now, the game starts up on both Joe's and Sue's SNES. Sue, being the "player 1", selects two players in the game. The input from Sue's controller (plugged into her SNES' controller port #1) travels over the network to Joe's SNES, where it's treated as "player 1". Joe's keypresses travel over the network and are treated by Sue's SNES as if he had his controlled plugged into the second controller port on her machine.

The games naturally have no idea that any kind of network is involved; they just think of/see this as two local players, sitting in the same room with the same SNES.

Since there are bound to be randomized/unpredictable events in most games, the "host SNES" (Sue's, in this case) regularly (often enough) sends over a copy of that SNES' RAM contents to Joe's, so that his SNES can update any differences that may have happened, such as getting a different item when running over a question mark block compared to what the other person's SNES picked, or updating the positions of the karts which may have "drifted" due to different choices being made by the two different (but still PAL) SNESes.

The end result is a smooth, rock-solid experience, and the exact same concept would of course apply to NES, N64 and all the other consoles. Maybe it would even be possible to somehow bridge PAL/NTSC versions, but I would assume that this is a ton of work and may be impossible.

Naturally, things are always much easier to think about than to actually do them, but it seems to me (after thinking about this for quite some time) that it should be at least *technically* possible. It would certainly be great for miserable loners such as myself.

Note that I'm not expecting you to be able to play eight players at once on Super Mario Kart or anything crazy like that. That would require actual (heavy) modifications of the game. I'm simply talking about allowing a "ghost" player two (or more, if the game supported it originally) with real hardware. For the same reason I never want to play a game at all using an emulator ever again, I would feel zero satisfaction from playing a SNES game networked using an emulator. Modern re-releases such as "virtual console" on the Wii/Wii U/Switch are also crap and wholly uninteresting to me.

Also, a big thing about this would be that you wouldn't have to hunt down and befriend somebody using the same emulator and arrange to "meet up" virtually, sharing IP addresses externally using a computer and whatnot. It would not require you to use a computer at all; just flick on the SNES, select your game, join a game (or start one yourself and wait for somebody), and then you play it. It wouldn't even require any kind of account/registration/login stuff.

6
I've tried to read the "Super Game Boy 2" thread. It spans ten pages from summer 2020 until early 2021. No more replies since February 15, 2021. That's worrying.

Can I ask about the status of this project/feature? I have no interest in running beta/alpha firmwares, but I really look forward for this to become an actual firmware update.

And how close to the real SGB 2 hardware will this be? Will it be impossible for a trained eye and ear to tell the difference between this and an actual SGB 2 (unless looking visually at the SNES)? Or is this like a "fun bonus hack" made just because the author wanted to do it, similar to a software GB emulator?

8
On the EverDrive 64, you simply make a BMP file with the correct dimensions and color depth and put it on the flash card and then select it from the menu to start using it. Perfect. Exactly as expected.

For the FXPAK PRO, on the other hand, there is a frustrating total lack of any kind of manual or information. I found some webpage which seems to hint at you having to basically "recompile" your own custom firmware for your FXPAK PRO to get a custom image, in turn trusting a random webpage with your personal data.

I certainly hope that I've got this all wrong. Even though I've read the sticky forum post about this. Is there really not some way to simply put an image file on the FXPAK PRO's flash card to make it use that instead of the ugly "sd2snes" one it uses by default, which doesn't even say the right product name? (It's an FXPAK PRO, dammit! It says it right on the cartridge!)

I want to use a personal photo from back in the day as the background, showing my SNES in its original habitat. Obviously, this is not something that is supposed to be published for the world to see. If I use that webpage ( https://sd2snes.de/themes/editor/ ), then whoever controls it (or has access to its webserver) potentially gets, saves and distributes/leaks a copy of my private data. It makes no sense to me.

It's maddening when somebody (whether it be a company or an individual) is intelligent enough and able to make some highly complicated and intricate electronics, such as the FXPAK PRO, yet still fail at the most basic, stupidly simple task: simply allowing the user to set a different background image in the menu! Or even just disable the default one, so that it's blank/black. It truly boggles my mind. I just can't get over things like this.

I really hope that the information I've found is outdated and that there is now a way to accomplish this from the device itself.

9
Verified: yes, it was the issue. So it's solved now.

10
After downloading the .bin files from that recommended site, comparing them to the ones I already have on my FXPAK PRO, I realized that the ones I have had the right file names but indeed end with .ROM and not .BIN. Dammit. Well, case solved, I guess. I'm pretty confident that this solves everything without having tried it yet.

11
You need the dsp*.bin and as the list by lee4 explains a few more files in the folder where the firmware is located and you need the correct ones. The right ones are mentioned by lee4 and can be found with google and "dsp1.bin dsp1b.bin dsp2.bin dsp3.bin dsp4.bin st0010.bin" caitsith2 is your friend here.

I'm not sure why both you and the other guy seemed to not notice my mention of having done exactly this. The only thing I can think of is that the files I got are somehow corrupted.

12
I'm mostly shocked that people are so incredibly lazy.

I'm not one to constantly switch between games, but sometimes, such a yesterday, I had to do it for the initial testing of my new Everdrive 64 X7. And sometimes you might make a mistake and accidentally launch the wrong game, etc. I have extension cords on my controllers and don't sit right there in front of it, and my back aches, so... But in a way, I like the idea of it being more "authentic" as you would have had to physically move to the N64 to switch physical cartridges back in the day!

13
Because on an N64 the cartridge connector does not support it. There are mods out there that have the capability, or you could use a smart switch and your phone, or not be lazy ;-p

Are you saying that there is something in the hardware design of the N64 that logically prevents the N64 from receiving a "shut down" or "reset" signal from the cartridge (Everdrive), which is on the other hand present in the NES/SNES? If so, that's very interesting to me.

14
These emulators are nothing like the SGB2 on the FXPAK Pro, they are just normal homebrew software running on the N64 itself. See them like technical demonstrations of what the N64 hardware is capable of. They are not bad for some quick NES gaming as many games runs pretty fine, but they are definitely not flawless. They are subpar compared to emulators for more modern systems, and definitely not good alternatives to a GB or NES flashcart.

If you are fine with emulation there are much better alternatives, such as a modern computer or a Raspberry Pi. Modern NES, GB and SNES emulators for computers are very mature and accurate. The SGB2 on the FXPAK Pro is an FPGA-based emulator so it's also much better (in theory) than a software-based one. There is no such thing as a flawless emulator though.

If you, like most of us here, want to play games on real hardware, you need a flashcart for every console you want to play on. The GBED X5 is very cheap for a flashcart. SGB, SGB2 and GBP (if you want to play GBC games on a TV) are also cheap and also contains authentic GB or GBA hardware.

Overall very good and informative reply. The only issue I have is with this part:

Modern NES, GB and SNES emulators for computers are very mature and accurate.

It sometimes feels like I'm the one person on this planet who just doesn't see this. I find all those emulators to be complete garbage, having tried them extensively regularly on many platforms/setups ever since the late 1990s. I will admit I used them for years, but it was only due to a combination of ignorance and the lack of money. This is the reason why I went the EverDrive/FKPAK PRO route -- it's the only way for somebody who cannot actually afford to collect the actual cartridges (now considered precious antiques) to be able to experience the golden games properly. It really is a night and day difference to me. The games just don't feel right on lameulators, besides all the actual visual/audio glitches.

15
you did not research / do homework hard enough that you need answers

U...hu.

* here List of Super NES games that use enhancement chips
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Super_NES_enhancement_chips#List_of_Super_NES_games_that_use_enhancement_chips

I did not request such a list. Why are you linking me to this?

* https://sd2snes.de/blog/downloads

Uh... Yeah. I linked to that exact page. What is your point?

Ironically, you didn't read my question before insulting me about "not doing research/homework". You just couldn't help yourself from being a smug prick, and I'm beyond sick of that mentality.

* https://sd2snes.de/blog/compatibility/in-game-hook-compatibility
L+R+Select+X   Reset to sd2snes menu

This, on the other hand, was actual information and answers my bonus question.

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